Season 2 Premiere

09.01.2020  |  Season 2  |  Episode 1



SHOW NOTES

We’re back!

Foreword has an exciting second season planned for you. But the start of a new season means the start of a new semester too. Check in with the hosts, and hear their recommendations for starting this academic year well, as well as some of the highlights from their summers.

Transcript

Intro
You’re listening to Foreword, a podcast from faculty at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, hosted by Michelle Knight, Josh Jipp, Madison Pierce, and James Arcadi. Foreword invites listeners into the mission of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School through conversations with faculty, staff, and guests.

Josh Jipp
Welcome to Foreword. I’m Josh Jipp.

Michelle Knight
And I’m Michelle Knight.

James Arcadi
I am James Arcadi.

Madison Pierce
And I’m Madison Pierce.

Jipp
We’re baaaaaack! [LAUGHTER] Hey, everyone, and welcome to Season 2. We’ve been planning, we’ve been strategizing this summer, and we’ve got a great season lined up for you! Madison, real quick question—if you had to describe our upcoming season with one word, one word only, what would you choose?

Pierce
I’m going to have to go with “groundbreaking.”

Jipp
Ooh! “Groundbreaking,” okay! Yes, I can see it! Well, hey, in a minute I want to ask you all a serious question, but before we get there, I prepared a little icebreaker question for us, just so we can kind of get into the swing of things. It’s been awhile since we’ve seen each other. So, here’s the icebreaker question: Sometimes at my family dinner table—this may be something you practice as well—everyone is talking, or it can be a little bit chaotic, and so we’ll ask the question of, “Let’s share highs and lows so that we can kind of catch up on each other’s day.” So real quick, what would be one quick high, one quick low that you had this summer?

Knight
Sure. Uh, let’s see. My low was the podcast producer informed me that every time I drink coffee, I slurp loudly into the microphone—

Arcadi
Ooh!

Knight
—and he’s been editing it out, so never am I doing that again [ARCADI LAUGHS]. So you guys will never have me drinking coffee again. It was really…it was…it hurt me a little bit. [ARCADI LAUGHS] Um, it was embarrassing, but I’m okay. Uh, high point—June. Can I have June be a high point? Like, June was—

Arcadi
Wow.

Knight
—I know, it’s big, but it was like, I was getting maximum work done. I, like, I had a good rhythm,  I wrote like, two chapters in my commentary, and I…flourished kind of in my rhythm. So it was a—it was just a great month of doing stuff I love.

Jipp
Very cool.

Knight
Yeah.

Jipp
Just real quick—I’m curious, Michelle, what you were working on.

Knight
I was working on my commentary on Joshua and my textbook on reading the historical books.

Jipp
Nice.

Arcadi
Awesome! Um, James Arcadi’s highs and lows—I mean, I think it’s kind of cliché, but I really enjoyed hanging out with my family this summer. We had a lot of time together, you know, just doing stuff around the house, or a couple of quick trips—did a quick little camping trip just this last weekend, so…yeah! It was great hanging out with the family. Lows were…lows of the summer were—I’m not quite sure if summer actually started or has ended. I sort of feel like—

Knight
So true.

Arcadi
—from March to the present, it’s going to be riding into October as just one great, big, long season, so maybe that’s kind of how other people are feeling in the pandemic age, but that’s certainly how I’ve been feeling.

Pierce
Yeah. For me the low, I think, is that I never got a puppy. I feel like, where is my puppy? [LAUGHTER] I should have a puppy, especially now that James and Josh have one and they just keep—

Knight
Yeah.

Pierce
—taunting me with it.—

Arcadi
Oh!

Pierce
—Actually, so, the high is that we traveled to see family this past week and that was amazing, but on the tail end of that—it kind of corresponded with my lows because we stopped at this gas station, and obviously, we were super careful and all of that—but while we were stopping, Isla, our daughter, was having some… like, she was upset, but suddenly, these two puppies, that were basically the cutest puppies I’ve ever seen in my entire life, they just appeared out of nowhere and were like, licking and playing and stuff, and she was just giggling, like, her whole mood was like, completely transformed. And we got to play with these puppies, and so…yeah…but then I was reminded, again, that…I don’t have a puppy. So.

Arcadi
Mmm.

Knight
That’s really hard for you.

Jipp
I think I might share mine with you, Madison. [LAUGHTER]

Knight
Are you over your puppy already?

Pierce
Oh, the puppy? Good! Yeah…good, good! [LAUGHTER]

Jipp
I…I…I’m not sure. I don’t want to, uh, I’m…I’m not “over” my puppy, but I—my puppy could be my high and my low this summer. [LAUGHTER]

Arcadi
It’s a fair amount of work, is it not?

Jipp
Yeah, I mean, it’s…the…so for us, Buxton has definitely like, become part of our family. He’s beautiful, the kids love him—I think Amber, my wife, loves him most of all. But yeah, the amount of the way it also has disrupted my sleep schedule has surprised me. [LAUGHTER] It’s felt like having a baby. So, in the morning, our routine has often been—this is the…this is the “high” and “low” nature of the puppy. The low is, I sometimes wake up at 4:45, 5:00, because he’s barking, and I take them outside to our backyard, and that’s my low until about 5:30, where I realize I’m actually enjoying reading outside, seeing the sun come up, you know, with my coffee, getting some extra reading in. So that might…that might be a…simultaneously a high and low, so…

Knight
Yeah. Good.

Jipp
Yeah. All right, well, life in 2020 has obviously been something of a roller coaster—I think we could probably agree on that. And there’s obviously been some real challenges. We’ve alluded to some of those already—for us as faculty, and we know for some of our listeners, the students—real challenges that we haven’t faced before as we are starting to get ready for the academic year. I was thinking today we could reflect a little bit on what some of these challenges are, as well as some of the opportunities that you think we’ll be facing this year, and maybe if we’re able, we could reflect a little bit on what we’re trying to do together, so that we can flourish in the face of all these challenges.

Knight
That’s great.

Jipp
So I know it’s a little bit of a change of pace, but I’d love to hear, you know, just…just—we’re all thinking about this probably every day—thinking a little bit of what’s…what’s been going through your mind as we get ready for an academic semester in just about a week, so…

Knight
Yeah.

Arcadi
One thing I could share just…it was kind of like, an “aha” moment, I suppose, in terms of, like, my perspective on the coming fall. So, truth be told, I mentioned, you know, the summer has felt kind of like just one long season, and what have…what have you. And I recall in early July thinking about the coming fall, and thinking about the different modalities of education that I was going to have to be working on, and the ways in which my summer felt like it was kind of getting sucked up by fall course prep and the like. And, to be honest, I was a little grumbly. I was a little “complain-ey.” My wife was probably tired of hearing me talk about that sort of thing. And then, I mean, I don’t want to over spiritualize it, if it was, you know, God showing me something or just kind of hitting this realization—it might have even been by looking at my class lists, but I sort of, like, realized there were students signed up for my classes, and, like, they were going to be there. They were going to show up to these classes and they were going to like, you know, whatever modality they could—whether it was, you know, synchronous online or in person with masks and etc., etc., etc. Like, they were showing up. And like, it kind of just hit me, like, if they’re gonna show up, like, I should show up as well. And so, you know, Arcadi stopped complaining and just like, you know, put the…put the work in to get these classes ready as best as can be done given all the, you know, all the things that are going on. So, I don’t know, that was a little bit of a pivot point for me that just kind of helped me, you know, through some of these things…you know, through some of these prep things that I hadn’t anticipated doing…whatever, a year ago or six months ago or something like that, but it’s kind of, I guess, encouraged me to…to do the best that I can given all of the disruptions that we’re having in our…in our education.

Jipp
Yeah, yeah.

Knight
Yeah. I, being a super extrovert, am about getting to like, the…you know like, when you run on fumes in your car, like, you’re way past “E” and you’re really just not sure you’re going to make it home? Like, I think I’m about there, in terms of, like, I daydream about just being in a crowded room and having everybody around me talking. Like, I don’t even want to talk to them, I just want the roar of a bunch of people around me. And so, knowing that there’s no part of the fall that’s going to be like that has been a significant challenge for me, and I know that that will be a significant challenge for many of our students as well. Even, like, I…I’m starting to grieve, like, as some people will be doing classes from afar, some will be in person, some will, you know, be doing things digitally. Even knowing the faculty aren’t going to be hanging out together and there’s not going to be Josh playing pranks on Madison, or, you know, me walking by and bothering, you know, Dr. Magary yet again—like, all of those dynamics I’m kind of really grieving, I guess, missing some of those. But on the flip side, kind of like James, I’ve had a couple aha moments, where, like…we have a new student in our program, and she is going to be able to join the program because of our synchronous course offerings. She doesn’t live here and she has the ability to start sooner than she thought because of that. And so, it was also neat to know that there are some students who actually have access to a seminary education in a way that they might not have otherwise. And so it’s exciting to know that in the midst of this, like, actually something redemptive and restorative and good is happening, where people are having access to the things they need. So that was kind of an exciting minute for me.

Pierce
Yeah.

Jipp
Yeah.

Arcadi
Cool.

Pierce
Um, I think there were some similar realizations for me as…I taught a course on… or a course I often teach on—Johannine Literature—you know, but in an intensive format in the last couple of weeks. And yeah, I had students—like, I have one student who’s had to commute her whole program, but she got to be home and be with her husband while she was doing it. I got to teach on the road. Like, I taught my class in like, three different states because we were on our way to travel. So those are fun things. I had a student that’s still in Korea who’s, you know, who’s coming in with us and was able to join because of, you know, because of this option. So, I think—what I was going to say is, I think that this time has really changed my understanding of community, because in some ways, it’s diminished it, because I’ve almost… I’ve forgotten what it really looks like to be present with someone and to be in this kind of embodied space. And so, I feel like, you know, I have to remember that, like, this is not the way it’s supposed to be and that things will go back to normal, like, this isn’t the way it’s going to be forever—please! But, it also has really enhanced my community, because I mean, I don’t know about y’all, but it didn’t seem natural to initiate some kind of, like, video call with someone or, you know, in another place before this.

Knight
Yeah.

Pierce
Certainly it was something that we did, but I feel like because this is such a natural option, that my community has expanded. I mean, one of the examples is like, I’ve been involved in a writing group with a bunch of women with IBR, and Michelle and I are involved in a, like, a commentary group of women who are writing for IBR. And so I feel like those are kinds of things that, like, that just wouldn’t necessarily have occurred to us before, but because we’re on Zoom, we’re thinking like, “Great! I can connect with someone, and this is more meaningful than, you know, the other kind of ways that we’ve connected before.” Um, but yeah. So.

Jipp
Yeah.

Knight
Yeah! To follow up on that, I mean, like, I was talking to somebody on Twitter, and he was like, “Let’s do a Zoom call!” And, uh, we like… so there was a guy from Southeastern Seminary, there was me, and then there was two people in Australia, and we all just, like, got on and chatted about this new book that was released. It was Chris, Madison. Uh, but it was…it was so fun to just like, chat with these international scholars like it was no big deal. And so, that—I’m glad you kind of highlighted it that way. It was so easy all of a sudden to reach out in new ways, and I have been able to have some of those kind of international encounters, which has been really neat.

Jipp
That’s really cool. I’ve, uh, I cur—full disclosure, and I will only say this one time, I’m on research leave, so I’m not doing this this upcoming year. Uh, but in the past, I’ve a couple of times invited other scholars into my class who weren’t able to be present physically through technology. That obviously seems to be a thing—kind of like Michelle and Madison as you’re both describing—something that’s…I think we’re seeing a lot more people are doing that now. Have you… do any of you have anyone lined up, or hoping to invite other professors into your classes this year?

Knight
Yeah! I have um…well, I’m bringing in some other TEDS faculty to some of my classes, but I’m also speaking in several classes—

Jipp
Okay, yeah.

Knight
—doing that from the flipside. So, even within faculty, like, that’s not always possible, and that’s a little bit more possible now.

Jipp
Right.

Knight
Um, but like, I have an archeologist coming into our Old Testament 5000 class and some things like that—“coming in”…“Zooming in”—and so, yeah I’m doing that. I don’t know if any of the rest of you guys are.

Pierce
No, I love that, though.

Arcadi
I don’t have that lined up yet—oh sorry, Madison—I don’t have that lined up yet. That sounds cool.

Pierce
Yeah.

Jipp
Yeah. So some of you alluded to this already in response to my question, but I’m curious how you would think…how you would answer this for students right now that are coming back to TEDS, and maybe they’re feeling some apprehension in terms of, “This is difficult,” or “This isn’t exactly what I envisioned my theological education being and I miss the classroom,” or “I wonder about the loss of normal chapel and community life.” I’m curious to hear, like, what you might think are just some good practices or responses that—I think we are already sort of pressing into some of these—but that you might encourage students to press into as well as they get ready for the year.

Knight
Madison, I really appreciated what you drew out about how we have to keep reminding ourselves that like, this isn’t our new normal, because I think occasionally I kind of forget how, like deep—as you said—like deep relationships should function and the way that I should be reaching out to people. And so I’m glad you reminded me of that, and I think sometimes that would be helpful for our students too—just the reminder that like, this is temporary, Lord willing, and that we need to be seeking out opportunities to continue growing in safe and deep ways. But I do think it is important to give ourselves and students continued opportunities to kind of grieve the loss we’re experiencing, because frankly, as much as we’re getting used to this, it’s not taking any less of an emotional toll. And I think occasionally, the longer this goes on, the harder we are on ourselves, about like, “Well just get over it. This is just how life is.” And, to some extent, sure. We’re all getting better at it. But we are still deprived of, like, some of the basic things that really make this great. And so I think that’s it’s good for us to kind of come together and be like, “We are mourning this, but we’re not in this alone and as a community, like, let’s fight to make the most of this and creatively figure out ways to assess it.” And for me, that’s been helpful to not feel alienated. It reminds me that I am one of, you know, thousands of people that are connected to Trinity that are desperately trying to figure this out, and we’re all kind of mourning this together. And just being able to not do that alone I think is something that we as well as our students will benefit from.

Jipp
Yeah. That’s great.

Arcadi
Yeah. That’s great, Michelle, that’s really…that’s really encouraging to hear. I guess for my own sake, the message I would communicate to students as well as to myself is just to focus in on, like, the “calling” aspect of this time and this season—I mean, I think theological education, the seminary formation that students are receiving at TEDS and that we’re trying to participate in as faculty. I mean, these are things we’ve been called to, I think, by God. And that call doesn’t like, diminish, necessarily, or go away just because things get a little trickier or get harder—or even get a lot harder. And I imagine that there have been other times and other places, you know, in the world and in Church history where it’s been even way harder to do theological education than what we’re experiencing right now, and yet, you know, those people who came before us answered that call, got the training, got the formation they needed to go out and preach the Gospel. And so, I’m trying to remember that for myself, that, you know, this isn’t just like, a time of kind of getting through it, whatever, and it’s going to be bad. But like, this is time, to be like, you know, train and be trained for those callings that God has for us, and um… and so focusing in on that I hope might be some kind of encouragement when it gets tough, you know, when we get “Zoom fatigue,” when it’s, like, “I just want to see someone in person,” or “when I’m in person but I don’t want to, you know, just see their mask. I want to see their, you know, their whole face,” or what have you. I mean, you know, this is the time we have for theological formation and I think focusing in on that call might be—hopefully will be helpful towards, you know, doing so with as much energy and strength as we have.

Pierce
Yeah. I agree. I mean, I think that trying to remember the parts of this that we get to keep—so yeah, we don’t get the face-to-face interactions, we don’t get the bumping into a colleague or a student in the hallway, or kind of just those organic conversations that I love about being on the TEDS campus. I mean, I miss so much the possibility of getting pranked by Josh, or somebody just popping by or whatever. I mean, that’s wonderful. But, there are so many things that we still get to do! I mean, we are still having the opportunity to continue to learn. I mean, our students especially, that they’re still getting content—obviously it’s delivered in a different way. They still get the chance to learn from each other as we’re in Zoom calls and stuff, and, I mean, and we as educators get the opportunity to learn about what, you know, how learning works. And, you know, I think that learning how to do classes on Zoom actually gives us the opportunity to understand what does and doesn’t work in a new way, so that we can pick up the pieces and kind of, I don’t know, analyze what we’re doing and see, you know, “Why does this work in person?” You know, “What is this valuable component of the learning experience, and why is it that I can’t get that in this current mode?” And so, it’s more like, we have just been doing stuff—or I’ll speak for myself. I have just been doing some stuff, and now I can kind of think through, like, “Why does the stuff that I’m doing work or not work, and how can I make it work here?” I don’t know if that makes sense.

Jipp
Yeah. Totally, yeah.

Knight
Totally. Because it is, like, a new pedagogical landscape, and so all of a sudden, we’re all like, thinking about teaching again. So if any of us were getting lazy—and I’m not saying that of anybody here—but if any of us were just, like, doing things automatically, all of a sudden we’re doing it really thoughtfully, and hopefully that will strengthen TEDS now and forever.

Pierce
Yeah.

Jipp
I think those are really good points. My fear is that by being on research leave, I’ll just get totally behind.

Pierce
Oh, are you on research leave, Josh?

Knight
Absolutely! [JIPP LAUGHS] What a surprise! I had no idea!

Jipp
[LAUGHS] Did I not mention that? I mean it’s kind of part of my identity for this year, but I’ve thought the same thing. Like, people are going—whether they want to or not, I mean, obviously no one’s signing up for this—they are going to learn a lot, in terms of what you were saying, in terms of new skills with regard to pedagogy, critical reflection on what they’ve done in the past. So yeah, I…yeah. I was, this year, I’ve tried to read The City of God about three times in my adult life and have never been able to make it. And I started it again back in the spring before COVID hit, and right when COVID came, I was still in the early books, where Augustine’s reflecting—at least one of the things he does—on all of the suffering that Christians have experienced in light of the sack of Rome and so forth. And I struggled…I appreciated but also struggled with some of his response to make sense of the suffering. I struggled with it at times because it felt like maybe it could acknowledge a little bit more the aspect of grief and lament—and sometimes I was a little concerned about valorizing suffering too much. But at the same time, I also, like, as we were experiencing some of our own losses, as quarantine had just started, thinking about ways in which, you know, he was arguing that, you know, suffering and difficulties often have a therapeutic sort of function that wean us from earthly attachments which are not, you know, to be at least our ultimate hope, and love, and joy. And I was thinking about how many…yes, like, I want to acknowledge, you know, as many of you have already, the real loss of community and going to church and so many different things that I don’t necessarily think are good in and of themselves, and yet, trying to look at, like, is there a way that God is working in the midst of pain and suffering to teach me new things, to wield me—to maybe wean me from loves and attachments that aren’t ultimately healthy. So…I don’t know. For me, that’s sort of like, a careful… like a fine line to walk, but it’s one of the perspectives I’ve had as I’ve sort of just dealt with some of the losses that I think we’ve all…we’ve all gone through.

Arcadi
Yeah. That’s cool. Thanks, Josh.

Jipp
Well, maybe just one more question. What would you say…some of the…if you’re a student at TEDS, you’ve obviously made a huge life decision signing up for theological education, the cost in terms of the finances, the labor, moving, I mean, so many things. You’ve already counted the cost. In some ways, you’re already living into, right, Jesus’ exhortation, “Take up your cross and follow me,” just in your initial decision to say, “I need more theological education.” There’s obviously a lot of churches that might look at that and say, “Why? How are you going to be a better ‘baptizer,’ you know, of people by going to seminary? How are you going to be a better administrator or executive leader? How are you..,” you know, on and on it might go, “What is theological education really going to do?” So maybe for—you’ve already reflected some on your own…how you’ve pressed into vocation being something to refocus on during this season, but what might be just sort of a brief reminder you might give to some of the students as they’re starting back at TEDS this semester?

Knight
Yeah, that’s a great question, Josh. I keep thinking about what a unique time it is and the fact that, if there’s ever been a time—in the same way that we’re all having to rethink pedagogy and the way we teach—everybody’s having to rethink the way they do life. They’re having to reassess their priorities and decide how to, you know, raise their kids and making big decisions about schooling and all sorts of things. And so if there’s ever a time for people to be reexamining their priorities and the way they think about things, it’s now. And so, we…it’s the time for us to be training students how to think well, to be evaluating things, and to have a theological reasoning that can guide them in that—not only that decision-making process, but guide them in shepherding others who are going through this process. Because, frankly, right now there are so many competing voices. America in particular is extremely polarized. Navigating the different claims, and thinking through things critically, and trying to listen well, but also humbly and critically—all of those skills are… seminary is an ideal place to kind of have a foundation in reasoning through different positions and things like that. And so it strikes me as just a really important time for us to be forming people into great thinkers, who can then turn around in their various contexts and help people to continue to think well.

Jipp
Yeah. That’s good.

Arcadi
Yeah, that’s a…that’s a great point, Michelle, and I was kind of thinking similarly on the sort of last point you were making there. I mean, I think one thing that we are trying to do at TEDS, both just by modeling as well as intentionally, is trying to experience some, like, charitable disagreement, or charitable discussions on topics of great importance, but that people have really deeply held different opinions on—different perspectives on. And, as you mentioned, I think the nuance and, you know, a diversity of voices is not something that’s going on all that great in Western culture at large, you know, you might say. But I think when you…when you study theology or you do your Biblical studies, or what have you, you realize there’s a lot more complexity to issues, of great importance, than sometimes is apparent at first blush. And one thing that I try to do in my classes, and I think you all do as well, is try to encourage this, like, “wrestling,” but like, wrestling together—not wrestling against one another, but, like, you know, it’s a “tag team” wrestling event, so to speak—

Knight
Yes, yeah.

Arcadi
—where we try to address the challenges, address the problems, address the theological issues, in order that we all might seek the truth that God has revealed Himself in the world and through Scripture also. So, I mean, I think this is an imperative time, or a really critical time, for us to continue to do that—to disagree, to think hard, but to do so charitably, to do so, you know, in love and respect for our neighbors, for those like us and those unlike us. And I think that that’s something that I’m, you know, kind of living into more, or trying to think more about in this particular season that we’re in, where things are already, I mean, kind of intensified for various reasons, you know, across the globe.

Jipp
Yeah. That’s great.

Pierce
Yeah. That’s super helpful. I’m not sure I can add much, but to say that we have—I mean, each of us did an M.Div, and so I think we all understand the breadth, or we all value breadth in our education, and I think that one of the things that I’ve been thinking about is just, um, all of the courses that I wasn’t sure that I needed when I was taking them ahead of time—you know, I’ve been counseling students, advising about them starting up, or what program they should do—and I find myself more and more sending people toward an M.Div. And one of the ways that I kind of back that up is talking about, you know, the gift that my counseling courses, for example, have been to me, as I inevitably have been counseling people—especially in the last six months. You know, my students are going through this difficult time. You know, thinking through how rich my courses on, you know, anthropology and, you know, kind of cultural sensitivity—how important those have been, especially as the world becomes more and more globalized, as we have conversations about our unity and diversity. And some of that touches on what James was saying. So, for me, it’s, you know, one, the people to whom we’re ministering—they’re in the thick of this too. And so I think that although some people may have personal, really significant circumstances that lead them to make the decision to step away for a time—and I don’t judge that for a second—but keeping in mind that you, doing your ministry, and you, doing your training in the midst of this, allows you to speak to what your people are facing in a different way than, you know, kind of withdrawing and resetting and all of that does. And again, no judgement if you need to take a break. But, pressing forward alongside the people in your communities that are pressing forward I think is a really valuable thing. And this comes back to what you were saying, James, about if they’re showing up, so should I—

Arcadi
Yeah.

Pierce
—I mean, likewise—if your professors are showing up, if your congregants are showing up, then so should you. But, yeah, I think that we just…we have to keep going together, and I don’t think that any of us should say that this six months or a year should be a time where we let the work of the Gospel fall by the wayside. We need to care for ourselves and we need to be careful, so, hear me—space and generosity—but we also, I mean, my goodness. We can connect with people in a new way. I mean—sorry, I’m going off on a tangent right here—but one of the things that I’ve loved in this season is being more present in my neighborhood and in my home, and the opportunity that it’s given me to connect with my neighbors in a new way. And so, thinking about the spaces that God has carved out for me as I’ve been in different localities, and thinking about the way that He’s setting up ministries for the years to come, has been something that I’ve really appreciated. And I think for our students, like, you know, having professors and other students to kind of think through those things is really valuable.

Arcadi
Yeah, totally.

Jipp
Hey, well, I knew you guys were all really fun, but that…everything you’ve shared just like, exudes a lot of wisdom, so thanks to each of you for some, you know, some really wise and I think helpful and practical responses to those questions as we get ready to face another year.

Pierce
Thanks, Josh.

Jipp
Well, that’s just the Foreword. Hey guys, it was really good to see you all again, and as I said, we are super excited about our upcoming season. We hope you’re going to keep coming back, we hope you’ll join us in our upcoming conversations. We want to give thanks to our producer, the rocking percussionist and fire-lightning cymbalist for the world class band, “Neck Punch,” Curtis Pierce. And, thanks to my wonderful co-hosts and to all of our listeners. I’m Josh Jipp.

Knight
I’m Michelle Knight.

Arcadi
I’m James Arcadi.

Pierce
And I’m Madison Pierce.

Jipp
See you soon, everybody.

Outro
Foreword is a podcast hosted by faculty at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. You can subscribe to our newest episodes on your preferred podcast app or at forewordpodcast.com. Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Facebook @forewordpodcast to get updates and additional links to content. Trinity Evangelical Divinity School is located 25 miles north of Chicago, with extension sites across the country and online. Trinity educates men and women to engage in God’s redemptive work in the world by cultivating academic excellence, Christian faithfulness, and lifelong learning. You can find more information at teds.edu.

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